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Posts treating: "animals"

Tuesday, 30 June 2015

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Super-Spiky Ancient Worm Makes Its Debut 

Utah Geological Survey - blog [2015-06-30 17:42:44]  recommend  recommend this post  (30 visits) info

 Cambrian
nationalgeographic.com From fantastical to frightening, the animals of the Cambrian Period—beginning about 540 million years ago—tantalize the imagination. And they just keep getting weirder. READ

Because Work is Ruff: Take Your Dog to Work Day at the Museum 

BEYONDbones [2015-06-26 13:00:45]  recommend  recommend this post  (23 visits) info

 US
by Victoria Smith, HMNS Executive Assistant   Here at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, we love all animals, not just extinct ones. When we heard it was Take Your Dog to Work Day, we thought that sounded like fun. … Continue reading

On Jurassic World and real 'raptors': Velociraptor, Deinonychus and Achillobator 

markwitton.com blog [2015-06-25 15:23:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (24 visits) info

 Cretaceous,Jurassic; US,MN
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The online palaeontological community has no shortage of words on the recently released Jurassic World movie – most of them concerning the deplorable disregard for the last two decades of dinosaur science. What of the movie itself? The critical response seems to divided, most reviewing it as a great popcorn movie, and the rest as a predictable, sexist and cynical summer film. My own take is the latter: Jurassic World was just another forgettable, contrived entry in the Jurassic Park [...]

14 Fun Facts About the Animals of “Jurassic World” 

Utah Geological Survey - blog [2015-06-23 19:21:16]  recommend  recommend this post  (28 visits) info

 Jurassic
smithsonianmag.com While the lead predator of the film might be a genetically modified fiction, these real fossil species were just as amazing and bizarre READ

The Jaws That Bite, the Claws That Catch 

Laelaps [2015-06-15 02:51:28]  recommend  recommend this post  (66 visits) info
Lions and tigers and bears, oh my. These are some of the most imposing predators to stalk the

New takes on the Wealden Supergroup palaeobiota, part 2: Baryonyx, freshwater plesiosaurs, ornithomimosaurs and others 

markwitton.com blog [2015-06-03 13:53:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (29 visits) info

 Cretaceous; NZ,US,GB,FR,IN
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Last week we took a look at some new art of animals from the Wealden Supergroup, the intensively studied, historically important Lower Cretaceous rocks of Southern Britain. We all know the Wealden for celebrity dinosaurs like Iguanodon and Baryonyx, but there's a heap of other interesting animals in there which get relatively little publicity. It's mostly these we're focusing on here, in the second (and final) part of these 'picture of the day'-style posts. As before, if you like anything [...]

The Making of California’s Mini-Mammoths 

Laelaps [2015-06-01 16:00:41]  recommend  recommend this post  (38 visits) info

 US
Over 80,000 years ago, somewhere on a southern California beach, a mammoth wanders across the sand. The beast

Dinosaur Physiology Debate Continues to Simmer 

Laelaps [2015-05-30 19:36:51]  recommend  recommend this post  (41 visits) info
Were dinosaurs warm-blooded, cold-blooded, or what? This is one of the most persistent questions in paleontology, and one

New takes on the Wealden Supergroup palaeobiota, part 1: Iguanodon, Neovenator, Eotyrannus and others 

markwitton.com blog [2015-05-27 23:21:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (26 visits) info

 Cretaceous,Carboniferous; GB,AU
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Regular readers will know that I'm prone to dabbling in palaeoart depicting the environments and animals of the Wealden Supergroup, the 18 million year stretch of Early Cretaceous time represented by mud-and sandstone deposits across the southern UK. Recently, I've been updating some existing Wealden work as well as producing some new stuff of other Wealden species. With no time to produce a new post of substance, here's a bumper 'picture of the day'-type post. Initially, I was going to chuck [...]

What do we do with the samples we ship home? 

polar soils blog [2015-05-06 00:09:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (41 visits) info

 US
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While we were in Antarctica earlier this year, we were able to do some of the analyses we need to measure on the soil we collected. However, we don't have the time or equipment to do everything we need, so all of our samples were boxed up and shipped back to Arizona.I flew home on an airplane in mid-January, but my samples stayed at Rothera until one of the U.S. research vessels came to pick them up. The samples traveled by boat to the U.S. research station, then eventually on to Chile. From [...]

Animals fifty million years into the future 

Earth Learning Idea [2015-04-23 00:09:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (28 visits) info

 GB
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Pupils from Box School in Wiltshire, UK have been trying out the Earthlearningidea 'Fifty million years into the future; investigating how animals become adapted to their environments'.   Click here to see their

Ocean Acidification & the Permo-Triassic Mass Extinction 

Palaeoblog [2015-04-13 15:04:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (30 visits) info

 Triassic
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Ocean acidification and the Permo-Triassic mass extinction. 2015. Clarkson, et al. Science Art by Basil WolvertonChanges to the Earth's oceans, caused by extreme volcanic activity, triggered the greatest extinction of all time 252 million years ago that wiped out more than 90 per cent of marine species and more than two-thirds of the animals living on land.Abstract[edit]: Ocean

Restoring a Brontosaurus 

RMDRC paleo lab [2015-04-08 00:31:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (71 visits) info

 US,BR
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Growing up in the 80's and 90's was a strange time for a dinosaur fan. On one hand there was a plethora of old books in the library on dinosaurs telling us all about Brontosaurus. On the other, we were getting it beat into our heads that Brontosaurus didn't exist, and it's really Apatosaurus. It was all confusing for those few of us that were actually actively interested in these animals. Today Emanuel Tschopp published a paper resurrecting the genus Brontosaurus as valid. Where does this come [...]

What’s up? The Friday links (76) 

paleoseismicity.org [2015-04-03 11:00:05]  recommend  recommend this post  (26 visits) info
Do you know your birthquake? And what do you think about animals behaviour before earthquakes? Did you hear about the NPG initative on an outsourced, but accelerated review process? Today is Good Friday, and here are your links! The Nature Publishing Group (NPG) – hosting Nature, Nature Geosciences and a lot of other renowned scientific journals has been working on new, faster and improved way of publishing manuscripts for some time now. One of the stages that makes publishing

How water tracks influence soil biology: the results 

polar soils blog [2015-03-27 05:03:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (34 visits) info

 PH,US,AQ,CA
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You might remember the field work we were conducting a couple years ago on water tracks. (You can read more about them in my posts from October 2012.) Water tracks are a type of groundwater where water from melting ice trickles down through the soil and moves along the permafrost, kind of like slow-moving underground streams.Water tracks are a common feature in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, but we actually don't know much about how they change the soil they're flowing through. The water they bring [...]

March 21st - Jurassic rocks in Oxfordshire 

Geology in the West Country [2015-03-14 19:02:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (39 visits) info

 Jurassic; GB,US
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Because of the popularity of this field trip, we have increased the size of the coach, so if you would still like to come, please contact John by email or 'phone 0117 9862529.If you would like a hand-out before the visit, please contact Elizabeth by email.Jurassic rocks of OxfordshireKirtlington Quarry SSSI - go back in time to a Jurassic environment similar to the Florida Everglades today. These conditions attracted many animals, and the quarry is famous for its rich diversity of fossils. [...]

On Dinosaur Time 

Laelaps [2015-03-08 22:00:33]  recommend  recommend this post  (92 visits) info
In my line of work, I throw time around a lot. In almost everything I write, I casually

Our newest little turtle: Jubal 

RMDRC paleo lab [2015-02-27 00:12:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (48 visits) info

 US,FR
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Apparently TPI is the new home for the small turtles of the Niobrara chalk. We've already prepared, molded and cast our tiny Chelosphargis advena, Prepared a new Prionochelys matutina, and show prepped a nice Toxochelys latiremis that we discovered this past spring, all with nice skulls.Our Prionochelys matutina specimen from MU5 (Coniacian)You'd think that we would be content with our fossil turtle stash, but no. You can never have enough of these little guys. This week we prepared from start [...]

12 Perks of Presenting HMNS Outreach 

BEYONDbones [2015-02-26 14:00:48]  recommend  recommend this post  (32 visits) info

 US
After bringing live animals, exotic insects, chemistry demos, and more to over 500 area schools and community organizations last year, the Houston Museum of Natural Science’s Outreach Programs are ready to hit the road in 2015! It takes quite a village … Continue reading

The early evolution of birds – more complicated than trying to untangle your headphones.. 

Green Tea and Velociraptors [2015-02-23 13:34:08]  recommend  recommend this post  (73 visits) info

 Cretaceous,Jurassic; CN,
Birds are a phenomenal story of evolutionary success. As modern-day dinosaur descendants, they occupy almost all environments and ecosystems around the globe, and are truly animals that capture our imaginations. However, how did they become so diverse, both in number and form? This is something only the fossil record can divine for us. Birds first appear in the Middle to Late Jurassic of China and latest Jurassic of Europe (hello, Archaeopteryx), around 160-150 million years ago. Their first [...]
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