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Posts treating: "meters"

Tuesday, 28 October 2014

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Lava Flow Approaching Residential Areas in Hawaii 

Geology.com News [2014-10-28 16:10:58]  recommend  recommend this post  (20 visits) info

 US
In Hawaii, a lava flow from Kilauea was nearing residential areas in the northwest portion of Pāhoa on October 27th. The flow front was heading towards a low spot on the Pāhoa Village Road, between Apaʻa St. and the post office. In this photo the flow front was 540 meters (0.3 miles) from Pāhoa Village

The Strange Medical Case of the Radioactive Landslide 

History of Geology [2014-10-16 19:55:23]  recommend  1 recommendations  (22 visits) info

 AT
The landslide of Köfels (named after a small village in Tyrol) is one of the largest recognized landslides in the Alps – large enough to dam up a 92 meters (300 feet) deep prehistoric lake and divide in two the valley of Ötz. Wood fragments discovered during the construction of a gallery in the landslide

Pyrite Strobeus Snail Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-14 03:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (45 visits) info

 US
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This is one beautiful and shiny fossil! It appears to be a Strobeus pyrite gastropod fossil. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters. More pictures below show some more specimens that were found. My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio

Shansiella? Pyrite Gastropod Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-10 03:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (20 visits) info

 Carboniferous; US
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This pyrite gastropod fossil appears to be a Shansiella. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters. My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figure 23 of specimen from Putnam Hill shale (Allegheny Group,

Pyrite Bellerophon Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-09 03:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (23 visits) info

 US
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This pyrite gastropod fossil has well defined ridges that make it easier to identify. It appears to be a Bellerophon. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters. My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figures 15-16

Pyrite Trepospira Gastropod Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-07 03:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (20 visits) info

 US
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This gastropod fossil is interesting as it pyrite embedded in a dark shale. It appears to be a Trepospira. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters. My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figures 13-14 of specimen

Coal Mine Cephalopod Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-06 04:36:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (36 visits) info

 Carboniferous; US
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This fossil is somewhat rare because it was found at a depth of 60-250 meters underground. The fossil was situated above the coal seam so it might be from the Pennsylvanian Period (late Carboniferous). It was found in Webster County Kentucky USA. The mines there are part of the Eastern Interior Basin. The formations found there are Sturgis, Carbondale, and Tradewater. The limestone layers

Clash Of Aquatic Titans: Elasmosaurus Vs Cymbospondylus 

Dinosaur Home - Blogs [2014-10-05 21:38:56]  recommend  recommend this post  (25 visits) info
Elasmosaurus vs Cymbospondylus Elasmosaurus- thin plate lizard Fighter Size- 14 meters long and 3 tons Weapons- Sharp teeth and size Weaknesses- Long neck and few weapons Cymbospondylus- boat spine Fighter Size- 10 meters long and 2.5 tons Weapons- Teeth, more powerful jaws, speed, and agility Weaknesses- Smaller of two fighters and light sensitive eyes Setting- The deep ocean FIGHT! An Elasmosaurus is hunting. Schools of fish are becoming rare and the [...]

Caecum Micro Sea Snail Shell 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-09-20 02:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (47 visits) info

 US
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Here is a magnified image of a Caecum sp. sea gastropod shell. It was found in 2014 during a diving trip to Key West Florida, USA. The specimen was about 2 km off shore in about 5 meters under the water. I do not think this is a fossil. Viewed under microscope with a 3 mm field of view. Thanks to Kenny for the specimen and Herb for letting me use his microscope. Learn more at these

Friday fold: Quartz vein in Catoctin Formation, Point of Rocks, Maryland 

Mountain Beltway [2014-09-12 13:41:09]  recommend  recommend this post  (29 visits) info

 Cambrian; US,CA
I took this image in 2005, when I was working up a geologic history of the C&O Canal National Historical Park. It’s a vein of quartz, gracefully folded within the Catoctin Formation. The exposure is along the railroad tracks at Point of Rocks, Maryland, easternmost extent of the Blue Ridge province on the north shore of the Potomac River. The Culpeper Basin begins about 100 meters to the east of

Northern Convergence: Vancouver Island, the Plan That Was, Part III 

Geotripper [2014-08-21 09:22:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (46 visits) info

 CA,US
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Road construction at Malahat Summit. Photo by Mrs. Geotripper. Continuing my brief series of things my students didn't see on Vancouver Island during our Northern Convergence tour of Canada, we reach a place my students did in fact "see", as in we were there and looking around, but the students didn't see what we saw. Malahat Summit is 352 meters above sea level, about 1,155 feet, and is

Site U1440B activity; A unique way to install a reentry system 

JOIDES Resolution blogs [2014-08-13 02:56:53]  recommend  recommend this post  (31 visits) info
Since we have already drilled a hole at Site U1440 (approximately 20 meters from where we are now) and collected sediment cores from that hole up until we hit hard rock, we started our second hole in a whole new way. Because this hole will be used to obtain cores from deeper depths we need to 'case' the hole to keep it stable. We also need to be able to re enter it several times. read

Super-typhoon Neoguri ("racoon") approaches Okinawa 

Geology in Motion [2014-07-07 18:19:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (18 visits) info

 JP,KM,PE,,US
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Super-typhoon Neoguri, first super-typhoon of 2014imaged on July 6 (?) by NOAA/EPAThree inches of rain PER HOUR??? I wonder for how many hours!! Waves up to 14 meters (45')? I have friends on Okinawa and  wish them well (and also asked them to send a first hand report!) The storm is expected to work its way up to mainland Japan by Wednesday. The highest danger is for Miyako-jima, in the center of the archipelago.     As I write this (Monday a.m. PDT) gusts of up to 270 [...]

The Bite Force Of T. Rex 

Dinosaur Home - Blogs [2014-07-01 09:42:45]  recommend  recommend this post  (22 visits) info
Ever since the first T.rex skeleton was pulled from the ground, it was known that this animal had an incredibly high bite force (its head was over 1.5 meters long and filled with teeth some 6-13 inches long, of course it did, haha). But the question was just how high? Early estimates put it at about

Exp 350: JR Casing Record! 

JOIDES Resolution blogs [2014-05-20 03:45:49]  recommend  recommend this post  (28 visits) info
On May 9th, 2014 the JOIDES Resolution set a new record for it’s deepest set casing, beating the old record by 19 meters (leg 186 hole 1151B)!!! The Siem offshore crew set casing down to 1,087 meters below sea floor (mbsf), that’s about 0.7 miles of casing! But what is casing? read

5 Echinoderm Highlights from the Okeanos Explorer Expedition to the Gulf of Mexico 2014 

Echinoblog [2014-04-30 06:18:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (31 visits) info

 ,NL
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As a big marine/deep-sea biology nerd, I've been following the recent NOAA Gulf of Mexico Expedition undertaken by the Okeanos Explorer via the live stream on their website. For those who may not be familiar, the Research Vessel (R/V) Okeanos Explorer deploys an ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) aka a robot submarine which can deploy to 6000 meters. The ROV has cameras that basically broadcast

Stone Spheres of Costa Rica 

Geology.com News [2014-04-06 13:31:03]  recommend  recommend this post  (68 visits) info

 CR,
In the 1930′s a fruit company was clearing farmland on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. During their work hundreds of stone spheres up to two meters in diameter were discovered. They are thought to have been made over 1000 years ago and their makers and the methods used to make them are unknown. It

Retreating Coastlines in Sussex 

Geology.com News [2014-04-03 13:46:30]  recommend  recommend this post  (20 visits) info

 GB
The chalk cliffs on the Sussex coastline normally retreat at about 3/4 meter per year, but storms in the first quarter of this year have produced several meters of

Out of the Valley of Death: Hitting the Lowest of the Low, the Driest of the Dry, and the Hottest of the Hot 

Geotripper [2014-03-22 18:41:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (33 visits) info

 US,
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Just how low can one go? Just how far can people descend in life before they hit bottom? In Death Valley National Park, there is a precise answer: -282 feet, or -85.5 meters at a spot called Badwater. That's also the lowest you can go in North America, but if you look at the big picture, there are seven other places around the world where you can sink even lower: Earth’s Lowest Elevations

Land Below Sea Level 

Geology.com News [2014-03-16 13:22:11]  recommend  recommend this post  (53 visits) info
Did you know that there are seven distinct depressions on Earth that are over 100 meters below sea level, and twenty-three that are over 10 meters below sea level and ten more that are at least two meters below sea level? We have a google map that points to ten of these depressions and a
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