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Posts treating: "meters"

Wednesday, 25 March 2015

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Clash Of The Reptiles And Amphibians Part 1 

Dinosaur Home - Blogs [2015-03-25 00:13:46]  recommend  recommend this post  (24 visits) info

 Triassic,Permian
Hello all, Today I am making a fight series. All right, let’s begin! Dimetrodon :Name  Meaning -Two types of teeth. Fighter size: 3.4 meters, 475 pounds, 1.5 meters tall. Gender-Female Dimetrodon was a massive Synapsid,at 3.5 meters long,and 500 lbs. Dimetrodon hunted it’s smaller relative,Edaphosaurus. Vs. Gorgonopsid  Fighter size: 2.8 meters,770 pounds,2 meters tall Gender:Male The Gorgonopsid was a mammal-like reptile. It was wiped out by the [...]

Largest Known Theropods 

Dinosaur Home - Blogs [2015-03-15 02:52:34]  recommend  recommend this post  (38 visits) info
Is T.rex really the biggest land theropod? Is it really 10 tonnes? Newest contenders for largest theropod - some new contenders have only been unearthed in recent years. Siats meekroum The only skeleton found of this Neovenatorid is only a juvenile and it is already 9 meters long and 4 tonnes!An adult might be 12.2 meters and 6.2

Carcharodontosauru S Sahricus 

Dinosaur Home - Blogs [2015-03-07 02:05:39]  recommend  recommend this post  (45 visits) info
Introduction: 98 million years ago,a apex sauropod hunter appeared,Carcharodontosaurus. Size: Carcharodontosaurus was estimated at 11-15 meters and 6-15 tons.More recent estimates put Carcharodontosaurus at 11-13 meters and 7 tons.It was beaten in size ONLY by Spinosaurus agyptiacus and Giganotosaurus carolinii. Classification: Carcharodontosaurus belongs to the Carcharodontosaurid group,a subgroup inside the group Carnosauria unlike Tyrannosaurus which belongs to the Coelosauria. [...]

Drilling deep 

AGU Meetings [2015-02-25 17:18:32]  recommend  recommend this post  (41 visits) info
We’re in the Indian Ocean currently drilling the deepest of a six hole transect across the middle of the Bengal submarine fan. The fan covers the bottom of the Bay of Bengal with sediments eroded from the Himalayas. We’ll be devoting almost three weeks of our eight-week International Ocean Discovery Program expedition to drilling at this site. Our target: to reach 1,500 meters (about a mile) depth. Drilling this deep is a major challenge when you are drilling into the seafloor, which just [...]

How Did Dinosaurs Get So Big? 

Dinosaur Home - Blogs [2015-02-21 06:33:48]  recommend  recommend this post  (38 visits) info
  Introduction: The Sauropods such as Apatosaurus and Brachiosaurus were Massive animals.Known for almost 190 years they have fascinated us. Sauropods: These are the titans of the dinosaurs.Reaching lengths of around 42 meters and weighing up to 90 tons.Now how did they get so big you may ask?There are many reasons why here are a few of them. -Defense -Lack of

Our Coring Toolkit 

JOIDES Resolution blogs [2015-02-18 23:51:25]  recommend  recommend this post  (30 visits) info
A few days ago we broke the scientific ocean drilling record for the deepest APC core ever obtained (687.4 meters below the seafloor!). But what is APC? And how does it differ from other coring systems? read

Bárðarbunga volcano update for 3-February-2015 

Iceland Volcano and Earthquake blog [2015-02-03 21:03:20]  recommend  recommend this post  (144 visits) info
Since last update of activity in Bárðarbunga volcano there have not been major changes in Holuhraun eruption. The lava lake in the crater has lowered by several meters based on pictures from Holuhraun today. Large cliffs have formed … Continue reading

How does 30,000 feet of drillpipe fit into one ship? 

JOIDES Resolution blogs [2015-01-25 07:22:06]  recommend  recommend this post  (39 visits) info
The JOIDES resolution is designed to perform deep sea drilling: even in water depths of 9000 meters (27,000 ft), the JR can drill 1000 meters (3000 ft) into the bottom of the sea. read

Computer models simulate asteroid impacts 

AGU Meetings [2014-12-19 17:16:34]  recommend  recommend this post  (23 visits) info

 US,IN
An asteroid impact 100 miles (170 kilometers) off the coast of Maryland would send waves up to 50 feet (15 meters) high onto the shore an hour later and massive flooding would occur three hours after impact, according to a new computer simulation of hypothetical asteroid impacts. The model is the first of its kind and federal agencies have used it to assess potential hazards arising from such impacts in an effort to increase U.S. emergency preparedness, planning and management, the scientists [...]

Lava Flow Approaching Residential Areas in Hawaii 

Geology.com News [2014-10-28 16:10:58]  recommend  recommend this post  (26 visits) info

 US
In Hawaii, a lava flow from Kilauea was nearing residential areas in the northwest portion of Pāhoa on October 27th. The flow front was heading towards a low spot on the Pāhoa Village Road, between Apaʻa St. and the post office. In this photo the flow front was 540 meters (0.3 miles) from Pāhoa Village

The Strange Medical Case of the Radioactive Landslide 

History of Geology [2014-10-16 19:55:23]  recommend  1 recommendations  (28 visits) info

 AT
The landslide of Köfels (named after a small village in Tyrol) is one of the largest recognized landslides in the Alps – large enough to dam up a 92 meters (300 feet) deep prehistoric lake and divide in two the valley of Ötz. Wood fragments discovered during the construction of a gallery in the landslide

Pyrite Strobeus Snail Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-14 03:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (57 visits) info

 US
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This is one beautiful and shiny fossil! It appears to be a Strobeus pyrite gastropod fossil. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters. More pictures below show some more specimens that were found. My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio

Shansiella? Pyrite Gastropod Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-10 03:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (27 visits) info

 Carboniferous; US
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This pyrite gastropod fossil appears to be a Shansiella. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters. My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figure 23 of specimen from Putnam Hill shale (Allegheny Group,

Pyrite Bellerophon Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-09 03:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (31 visits) info

 US
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This pyrite gastropod fossil has well defined ridges that make it easier to identify. It appears to be a Bellerophon. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters. My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figures 15-16

Pyrite Trepospira Gastropod Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-07 03:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (25 visits) info

 US
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This gastropod fossil is interesting as it pyrite embedded in a dark shale. It appears to be a Trepospira. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters. My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figures 13-14 of specimen

Coal Mine Cephalopod Fossil 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-10-06 04:36:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (42 visits) info

 Carboniferous; US
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This fossil is somewhat rare because it was found at a depth of 60-250 meters underground. The fossil was situated above the coal seam so it might be from the Pennsylvanian Period (late Carboniferous). It was found in Webster County Kentucky USA. The mines there are part of the Eastern Interior Basin. The formations found there are Sturgis, Carbondale, and Tradewater. The limestone layers

Clash Of Aquatic Titans: Elasmosaurus Vs Cymbospondylus 

Dinosaur Home - Blogs [2014-10-05 21:38:56]  recommend  recommend this post  (35 visits) info
Elasmosaurus vs Cymbospondylus Elasmosaurus- thin plate lizard Fighter Size- 14 meters long and 3 tons Weapons- Sharp teeth and size Weaknesses- Long neck and few weapons Cymbospondylus- boat spine Fighter Size- 10 meters long and 2.5 tons Weapons- Teeth, more powerful jaws, speed, and agility Weaknesses- Smaller of two fighters and light sensitive eyes Setting- The deep ocean FIGHT! An Elasmosaurus is hunting. Schools of fish are becoming rare and the [...]

Caecum Micro Sea Snail Shell 

Louisville Area Fossils [2014-09-20 02:30:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (54 visits) info

 US
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Here is a magnified image of a Caecum sp. sea gastropod shell. It was found in 2014 during a diving trip to Key West Florida, USA. The specimen was about 2 km off shore in about 5 meters under the water. I do not think this is a fossil. Viewed under microscope with a 3 mm field of view. Thanks to Kenny for the specimen and Herb for letting me use his microscope. Learn more at these

Friday fold: Quartz vein in Catoctin Formation, Point of Rocks, Maryland 

Mountain Beltway [2014-09-12 13:41:09]  recommend  recommend this post  (39 visits) info

 Cambrian; US,CA
I took this image in 2005, when I was working up a geologic history of the C&O Canal National Historical Park. It’s a vein of quartz, gracefully folded within the Catoctin Formation. The exposure is along the railroad tracks at Point of Rocks, Maryland, easternmost extent of the Blue Ridge province on the north shore of the Potomac River. The Culpeper Basin begins about 100 meters to the east of

Northern Convergence: Vancouver Island, the Plan That Was, Part III 

Geotripper [2014-08-21 09:22:00]  recommend  recommend this post  (50 visits) info

 CA,US
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Road construction at Malahat Summit. Photo by Mrs. Geotripper. Continuing my brief series of things my students didn't see on Vancouver Island during our Northern Convergence tour of Canada, we reach a place my students did in fact "see", as in we were there and looking around, but the students didn't see what we saw. Malahat Summit is 352 meters above sea level, about 1,155 feet, and is
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